Sections

Vincent's works

Vincent was an amazing organizer.

Clergy

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The Congregation of the Mission is a community of Roman Catholic priests and brothers founded by St. Vincent de Paul in 1625 for the evangelization of the poor and the formation of the clergy.

Vincentian priests and brothers total over 4000 worldwide and serve in 86 countries.



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Missions

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Parishes

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Daughters of Charity

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In 1633 Vincent de Paul, a French priest and Louise de Marillac, a widow established the Company of the Daughters of Charity as a group of women dedicated to serving the "poorest of the poor." Prayer and community life were essential elements of their vocation of service with a characteristic spirit of humility, simplicity and charity.

Almost two centuries later, Elizabeth Ann Seton, the American foundress of the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph's, adapted the rule of the French Daughters of Charity for her Emmitsburg, Maryland community. In 1850, the Sulpician priests of Baltimore successfully negotiated that the Emmitsburg community be united with the international community based in Paris.

Today, the Daughters of Charity are an international community of over 19,900 Catholic women ministering in 91 countries. The works of today include focus on globalization, immigration, and issues of ecology. The Daughters of Charity still serve the "poorest of the poor." Their ministry touches those in need through education health care, social, and pastoral services. Prayer and community life are essential elements for their vocation of service.

History

In December 1617, in response to the immense poverty in France, Vincent organized women from affluent families who shared his concern into the Ladies of Charity. The great demand for service showed a need for additional help.

When Marguerite Naseau, a poor young woman from a small town outside Paris, told Vincent of her desire to serve the poor, he took her to Paris. She was the first member of the Company of the Daughters of Charity. Vincent's concept differed from existing religious orders whose members were not free to provide direct service to the poor in their homes and in hospitals.

According to Vincent, these women would have

  • for monastery, only the houses of the sick
  • for a cell, a rented room
  • for a chapel, the parish church
  • for a cloister, the streets of the city
  • for enclosure, obedience
  • for grille the fear of God;
  • for a veil, holy modesty.

As the numbers of the Company grew, Vincent understood the need for their formation and guidance. He asked Louise de Marillac to assume responsibility for this. The community was established on November 29. 1633. In contrast to a religious order in which perpetual (i.e., permanent) vows are taken, vows were to be made annually. Such organizations are recognized by the Church as Societies of Apostolic Life.

Ministries

The Daughters of Charity

  • educate and minister to youth and children;
  • provide elder care;
  • work with individuals who have disabilities;
  • minister to the homeless;
  • provide health care;
  • serve migrants;
  • minister to persons with addictions;
  • provide pastoral care;
  • minister to prisioners;
  • identify and organize services for the poor and marginalized;
  • work with communities to accomplish systemic change.

Provinces of the Daughters of Charity

Provinces of the Daughters of Charity

Africa

Daughters of Charity - Province of Cameroon
Daughters of Charity - Province of Central Africa
Daughters of Charity - Province of the Congo
Daughters of Charity - Province of Eritrea
Daughters of Charity - Province of Ethiopia
Daughters of Charity - Province of Madagascar
Daughters of Charity - Province of Mozambique
Daughters of Charity - Province of Nigeria
Daughters of Charity - Province of North Africa

Asia

Daughters of Charity - Province of China
Daughters of Charity - India – Province of North India
Daughters of Charity - India – Province of South India
Daughters of Charity - Province of Indonesia
Daughters of Charity - Province of Japan
Daughters of Charity - Province of the Near East
Daughters of Charity - Province of Philippines
Daughters of Charity - Province of Thailand
Daughters of Charity - Province of Vietnam

Europe

Daughters of Charity - Province of Albania
Daughters of Charity - Province of Austria
Daughters of Charity - France – Province of North France
Daughters of Charity - France – Province of South France
Daughters of Charity - Province of Germany
Daughters of Charity - Province of Great Britain
Daughters of Charity - Province of Hungary
Daughters of Charity - Province of Ireland
Daughters of Charity - Italy - Province of Naples
Daughters of Charity - Italy - Province of Rome
Daughters of Charity - Italy - Province of Sardinia
Daughters of Charity - Italy - Province of Siena
Daughters of Charity - Italy - Province of Turin
Daughters of Charity - Province of Netherlands
Daughters of Charity - Poland - Province of Chelmno-Poznan
Daughters of Charity - Poland - Province of Krakow
Daughters of Charity - Poland - Province of Warsaw
Daughters of Charity - Province of Portugal
Daughters of Charity - Quasi-Province
Daughters of Charity - Province of Romania
Daughters of Charity - Province of Slovakia
Daughters of Charity - Province of Slovenia
Daughters of Charity - Spain - Province of Barcelona
Daughters of Charity - Spain - Province of Canary Islands
Daughters of Charity - Spain - Province of Gijón
Daughters of Charity - Spain - Province of Granada
Daughters of Charity - Spain - Province of Madrid St. Louisa
Daughters of Charity - Spain - Province of Madrid St. Vincent
Daughters of Charity - Spain - Province of Pamplona
Daughters of Charity - Spain - Province of San Sebastián
Daughters of Charity - Spain - Province of Seville
Daughters of Charity - Province of Switzerland

North America

Daughters of Charity - USA East Central Province - Evansville
Daughters of Charity - USA North East Province - Albany N.Y.
Daughters of Charity - USA Province of the West - Los Altos Hills
Daughters of Charity - USA South East Province - Emmitsburg
Daughters of Charity - USA West Central Province - St Louis

Oceania

Daughters of Charity - Province of Australia

South America

Daughters of Charity - Province of Argentina
Daughters of Charity - Province of Bolivia
Daughters of Charity - Brazil - Province of Amazonia
Daughters of Charity - Brazil - Province of Belo Horizonte
Daughters of Charity - Brazil - Province of Curitiba
Daughters of Charity - Brazil - Province of Fortaleza
Daughters of Charity - Brazil - Province of Recife
Daughters of Charity - Brazil - Province of Rio de Janeiro
Daughters of Charity - Province of Central America
Daughters of Charity - Province of Chile
Daughters of Charity - Province of Colombia - Bogota
Daughters of Charity - Province of Colombia - Cali
Daughters of Charity - Province of Cuba
Daughters of Charity - Province of Dominican Republic
Daughters of Charity - Province of Ecuador
Daughters of Charity - Province of Haiti
Daughters of Charity - Province of Mexico
Daughters of Charity - Province of Paraguay
Daughters of Charity - Province of Peru
Daughters of Charity - Province of Puerto Rico
Daughters of Charity - Province of Venezuela

Prominent Daughters of Charity

Sr. Mary Rose McGeady, DC

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External Links

Confraternities of Charity

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Prisoners

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Council of Conscience

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War Relief

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Ladies of Charity

Overview

Ladies of Charity refers to an organization of Catholic lay women volunteers that was founded by St. Vincent de Paul.

St. Vincent de Paul was a parish priest at Chatillon-les-Dombes in 1617, when, on a special Feast Day, a woman parishioner told him of a local family in dire need of help. The entire family was ill and none could care for the others. Vincent spoke of the family's needs during his sermon. As a result of this sermon an outpouring of charity was so spontaneous and abundant that the family was overwhelmed with food and visitors. Viewing the abundance of food and provisions, Vincent said, "This poor family will have too many provisions at one time and some will be spoiled and wasted. In a short time these persons will be reduced to their former state of need. Would it not be possible to induce these good women to give themselves to God to serve the poor permanently.

A few days later, on August 23, Vincent called a meeting of the women of the area and suggested that they band together to carry out this good work. They agreed to form an association in which each would take her turn in serving the poor corporally and spiritually. Thus was the founding of the first of the Confraternities of Charity. The seeds that were planted at Chatillon-lesDombes germinated and flourished in other districts.

By December 8, 1617, the first association of the Ladies of Charity was canonically erected. All subsequent associations were established with the approval of the Holy See. To maintain the spirit of charity and unity among them, St. Vincent chose Louise de Marillac, his devoted cooperatrix to visit the Associations to see that they were properly organized and work was performed in the right spirit. On March 11,1934, Pope Pius Xl canonized Louise and proposed her as a model for the Ladies of Charity.

Throughout most of the world, the Ladies of Charity are known as AIC (International Association of Charity). In the United States this group is known more popularly as the Ladies of Charity USA.

External Links

<a href="http://www.aic-international.org/en/index.php">AIC Web site</a> <a href="http://www.famvin.org/LCUSA/">Ladies of Charity - United States</a>