“The Giving Pledge is about changing the culture of giving,” (BUSINESS WIRE)–Seventeen more of America’s wealthiest families have committed to returning the majority of their wealth to charitable causes by taking the Giving Pledge.

The announcement of a second group of pledgers follows news in August of this year when 40 families took the pledge, a long-term charitable project launched by Warren Buffett and Bill and Melinda Gates.

“I’m delighted to welcome these 17 families into the Giving Pledge community”

“People wait until late in their career to give back. But why wait when there is so much to be done?” said Mark Zuckerberg, co-founder, CEO and president of Facebook. “With a generation of younger folks who have thrived on the success of their companies, there is a big opportunity for many of us to give back earlier in our lifetime and see the impact of our philanthropic efforts.”

“I’m delighted to welcome these 17 families into the Giving Pledge community,” said Warren Buffett, pledge co-founder and chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway. “In just a few short months we’ve made good progress. The Giving Pledge has re-energized people thinking about philanthropy and doing things in philanthropy and I look forward to many more conversations with families who are truly fortunate, and whose generosity can and will change lives.”

Announced in June, the Giving Pledge now includes 57 families from across the United States. Additionally, both Buffett and the Gateses have begun conversations with billionaires from other countries to learn about their philanthropy efforts and what has worked in their countries.

“The Giving Pledge is about changing the culture of giving,” said Peter Singer, professor of bioethics in the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University and author of “The Life You Can Save.” “Research shows that when people know that others are giving, they are themselves more likely to give. So publicly pledging to give will encourage others to give. This holds true for billionaires and for those of us who aren’t anywhere near that level of wealth. We can all make a difference, and play our part in making the world a better place.”

A full list of those taking the pledge and personal letters by many of these pledgers outlining their commitment to give is available online at www.givingpledge.org.

The Giving Pledge is an effort to help address society’s most pressing problems by inviting the wealthiest American families and individuals to commit to giving more than half of their wealth to philanthropy or charitable causes. The pledge is a moral commitment to give, not a legal contract, and it does not involve pooling money or supporting a particular set of causes or organizations. While it is specifically focused on billionaires or those who would be billionaires if not for their giving, the idea takes its inspiration from other efforts that encourage and recognize givers of all financial means and backgrounds.


“People wait until late in their career to give back. But why wait when there is so much to be done?” said Mark Zuckerberg, co-founder, CEO and president of Facebook. “With a generation of younger folks who have thrived on the success of their companies, there is a big opportunity for many of us to give back earlier in our lifetime and see the impact of our philanthropic efforts.”

“I’m delighted to welcome these 17 families into the Giving Pledge community,” said Warren Buffett, pledge co-founder and chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway. “In just a few short months we’ve made good progress. The Giving Pledge has re-energized people thinking about philanthropy and doing things in philanthropy and I look forward to many more conversations with families who are truly fortunate, and whose generosity can and will change lives.”

Announced in June, the Giving Pledge now includes 57 families from across the United States. Additionally, both Buffett and the Gateses have begun conversations with billionaires from other countries to learn about their philanthropy efforts and what has worked in their countries.

“The Giving Pledge is about changing the culture of giving,” said Peter Singer, professor of bioethics in the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University and author of “The Life You Can Save.”

“Research shows that when people know that others are giving, they are themselves more likely to give. So publicly pledging to give will encourage others to give. This holds true for billionaires and for those of us who aren’t anywhere near that level of wealth. We can all make a difference, and play our part in making the world a better place.”

A full list of those taking the pledge and personal letters by many of these pledgers outlining their commitment to give is available online.


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