Pew Research is at it again.

About a quarter of U.S. adults (27%) now say they think of themselves as spiritual but not religious, up 8 percentage points in five years…

What does this mean to communities and groups that have been sent to evangelize the poor? What do we have to offer?

Do we share that the deepest answers to the deepest longings are found in a community that lives and celebrates its relationship with the Ultimate?

Are we convinced the “spiritual AND religious” is the only phrase that makes sense? (“Spiritual but not religious” is empty; “religious but not spiritual” is probably at least neurotic.)

Do we tell our friends that “feeling” connected to the Ultimate (spiritual) is not the same as “being” connected (spiritual AND religious)?

Do we share the divine solidity that we have in being “sent?” (mystics of Charity — spiritual AND religious.)

Our tradition has a lot to say. Do you know it? Do you realize that it was born out of a deep relationship with Christ within his Church (spiritual AND religious) and that it is rarely found outside of a living faith community?

Are you afraid to tell your friends that?

Here’s a strategy. I memorize Vincentian Quotes. I share them with friends. When they ask, “Where did you get that?” I tell them.

And I don’t just mean the URL.

Evangelizare pauperibus misit me.


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